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July 4th Overview

July-4th The birth of American freedom, liberty and independence on July 4th has changed not only the world’s history and the course of political events, but also the nation’s outlook and behavior in general. The appearance of July 4th or Independence Day, which is another common name for the holiday, was caused by a revolutionary successful attempt of American colonies to fight for independence from Great Britain.

Historic overview. Inspired by a Henry Lee’s resolution (introduced at State House in Pennsylvania on June 7, 1776), a committee of five men voted for the break with Great Britain on July 2nd. The committee consisted of representatives of the following colonies: Massachusetts (John Adams), Virginia (Thomas Jefferson), Pennsylvania (Benjamin Franklin), Connecticut (Roger Sherman) and New York (Robert R. Livingston). Interestingly, New York was one of the states that abstained at first, though voted in favor of resolution of Henry Lee later.

While July 2nd is the date of a secret informal meeting of the Continental Congress, July 4th is considered to be an official day when the Congress declared the separation from Great Britain and adopted a document known in American history as the Declaration of Independence. The document was largely written by the representative from Virginia, Thomas Jefferson, who later became the 3rd President of the United States.

Celebrations. From bell’s ringing, bonfires, public readings of the Declaration of Independence and holding mock funerals for King George III in the revolutionary years to huge parades, concerts and fireworks of the present time, July 4th has always been a traditional patriotic celebration of the birth of American independence and important reminder of historic heritage of the country.

Nowadays, July 4th is a federal paid holiday associated with both throwing big parties and doing quiet family leisure activities. During these three-days off holiday, Americans go on vacations and spend time with close-knit people. American flag, the national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner” are considered to be the main symbols of Independence Day.