The plainchant Alleluia “Caro mea” from the Mass for the Feast of Corpus Christi and the Eagle Dance of the Ildefonso Indians of New Mexico are both examples of monophonic chant. However, these two pieces are common in other musical aspects.

Both pieces of music are used for ceremonial purposes. While the Plainchant Alleluia “Caro mea” is used for Mass, the Eagle Dance of the Ildefonso Indians of New Mexico is used for rain ceremony. Both pieces have a monophonic texture( Santa Clara Dancers and Drummers, 2010). At some part, both have choruses. In the Caro mea, there is a group of responding while in the Eagle Dance, there is a single monophonic line where males sing in unison.  There is tempo in both pieces; for instance in the Caro mea, it is at “et sangius meus vere est potus” while in the Eagle Dance, drum beats stimulated an instance where one could tap his foot along with the music (Westminister Cathedral  Choir, 2010). There is a group of people in both pieces. Lastly, at some time, the two pieces slow down; for the Eagle Dance, it is when it comes near its end while in the Caro mea, it at “mean carnem”.

Both pieces of music differ. In the Eagle Dance, there is no rhythmic structure unlike in the Caro mea. In Caro mea, there is a soloist who leads the music. On the other hand, Eagle Dance lacks this and instead, has male voices singing in unison. Unlike in the Caro mea, there are percussion instruments in the Eagle Dance. Unlike in the Caro mea where the chant is not supported by percussion instruments, in the Eagle Dance, they are used to support the monophonic melody.

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