The second part of chapter 4 of the Outsider is set up in a courtroom whereby deliberations were taking place. The set up is not adequate since Meursault the prosecuted person feels out of place as he sits in the prisoner’s dock instead of being in the courtroom. He feels isolated from the entire deliberation process as he says that, they seemed to be arguing as if the case had nothing to do with him. The setting on the other hand was suitable for case deliberation as it was a court. The presence of prisoner’s dock also indicates that the setting is suitable for the occasion. The atmosphere of the deliberation process is similar to that found in literal courts.

The humanity of Meursault is reduced by the summation presented by his own lawyer. His name is replaced by pronoun I and this makes him feel out of place as he feels he is not on trial but rather his morals are. The characters in the court room are found wanting since they do not give the prosecuted man a chance to present his case but rather they carry out the entire process without hearing his own side of the story as if he was not involved. While in the dock, Meursault flashes back to his happy moments in life which he is to cherish and keep forever. He feels that he has lost this happiness and it is then that he mange to realize an intrinsic value which he had previously ignored in the moments he had lost. He feels nothing for his surrounding. The court should have given Meursault a chance before judging him and keeping him behind bars unjustly.

The moment moves very quick when Meursault is directed to the court so as to hear that the guillotine would decapitate him. Most eyes have turned away and thus he does not make eye contact with anyone. The verdict bizarre is echoed in the bizarre language in which case the verdict is read in. Surreal and contraction is observed in the claim that Meursault is being killed for the French people in the public square. The contradiction arises from the feelings he picks up on the faces of individuals who turned him in. It is paradoxical and out of place to show gentleness and consideration toward Meursault, a man they just condemned. The deliberation process has been ludicrous in addition to taking a ludicrous end. This is because Meursault is condemned for a different crime from the one he committed. He is to be killed afterwards in the name of many individuals whom he will never come across. Meursault has nothing to comment on since he believes it would not matter anyway. Either ways could have resulted from the paths in the sun. The events of the trial surround Meurasault but instead of him being the point of reference, the lawyers and the other participants are the ones deliberating on the case. An innocent man is judged unjustly (Camus, 1989).

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