Several environmentally friendly cities across the world have employed the use of technology for efficient power generation and supply. The city of Charlotte in association with the Siemens technologies have made a significant step towards achieving the use of clean energy by their investment in the first ever gas turbine. The sustainable part of the project begins at the production stage where there is a combination of the use of highly efficient steam and gas turbines that by design does not emit any pollution to the environment. There is also the incorporation of solar and wind turbines that are some of the highly environmentally friendly sources of power generation in the world (Siemens, 2012).

The project has had positive outcomes for the city of Charlotte as a whole and will continue to do so into the future. For instance, by its design, the project has ensured that the people living in this city get quality energy that will not hamper the lives of the future generation as happens with nuclear energy. On the same note, the project has created a whooping seven thousand employment opportunities to a city that has been suffering from massive rates of unemployment. Technically, the project has also been very efficient by deliberately ensuring that there is minimum loss of energy during transportation to consumer households as the project employs the use of high voltage direct current lines that are known to be energy conserving (Siemens, 2012).  

However, despite the tremendous positive attributes of the project, it has had some of its downfalls which majorly are in terms of costs. In order to operationalize the whole project system, Siemens technology firm in association with the city administrators have had to invest a total of 350 million dollars. This kind of investment means that poor cities like in the developing countries can hardly implement this program as part of their sustainable development. I do believe that the project can be replicated anywhere else in the world so that the whole world can have efficient energy (Smith and Rees, 1998).

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