Oct 3, 2018 in Law

Community input has become a very crucial determinant for the success of any community based policing. For successful policing, information from the community is imperative. Effective community policing and management requires certain types of information that has not been traditionally available in all police or administration departments. In Gary Gordner’s Community: principles and elements (1996) summarized article, it is viewed that for better policing, there are some aspects of information that are required. These include crime analysis, program evaluation, departmental assessment and performance appraisal. These are the contended issues that can enhance community policing.

Community policing is often associated with styles of leadership, management, and supervision that give more emphasis to organizational culture and values and less emphasis to written rules and formal discipline. Gordner (1996) observed that when citizens are guided by a set of officially sanctioned values they will usually make good decisions and take appropriate actions. Although many formal rules will still probably be necessary, authorities will need to resort to them much less often in order to maintain control over community members. These management practices include empowerment, mentoring, strategic planning and effective and selective discipline.

It is also important to recognize an Organizational Dimension that surrounds community

Policing and how greatly it affects its implementation. In order to support and facilitate community policing, it is often important to consider a variety of changes in the community, administration, management, and supervision.

 In order to have a good community policing, the community input should be considerably high, perfect and to the required standards and the community policies implemented should be followed and adhered to properly. The philosophical, strategic and tactical dimensions are the only key things to help build a good community policing.

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