The ideas of capitalism and Protestantism have not only influence the cultural dimension of the society but also dictated one of the societal tenets of development: University Education. As (Webber, & Parsons, 2003) say, meaningful participation in the current world's rewarding economic functions and careers involves previous ownership of skills and generally an expensively defined qualification in education. The skills and the desired academic qualifications have largely been accepted as the only basis for a prosperous future of any student in a University today.

This prosperous future from the socio-economic protestant traditionalism seems, undoubtedly, to be a factor which would essentially foster the doubt that collectivity in production as proposed by Catholics is rewarding, (Webber, & Parsons, 2003). And combining the Luther ideologies and capitalism, University students, just like the larger society, have come to admit that success can only be achieved at the individual selfish level. A culture of competition among the students has therefore been cultivated. Who does not want to get the grades for a good job anyway? Exams in any institution only reward those who have either consciously or unconsciously complied to the system through 'hard work'. Examinations do not reflect our own abilities in the wider context but restrict themselves to some knowledge prescribed by educationists. The academically weak are under pressure to perform and yet they have no idea how. Two academic social classes are therefore evident: the academically weak and the academically privileged, (Webber, & Parsons, 2003).

As exams approach, an instinctive communication takes place and through the capitalistic stimulus each student realizes they owe themselves one thing; passing the exams by whatever means. The last minute rushes melt the courage of the academically weak but are good for the academic capitalists and Protestants: the 'brighter one'. When caught up by time, 'creative' methods to take short-cut 'flights' to success, like cheating, are called to task.

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